Pediatric Medical Center is open by appointment M–F 9-5:15 and Sat from 8:30am. Closed Sundays. 562-426-5551. View map.

The Informed Parent

What’s Up Doc?

by John H. Samson, M.D., F.A.A.P.
Published on Feb. 05, 2015
{category_name

OUT-OF HOSPITAL MEDICATION ERRORS AMONG YOUNG CHILDREN IN THE UNITED STATES, 2002 – 2012

Maxwell D. Smith, Henry A. Spiller,MS.D.ABAT, Marcel J. Casavant, MD,Thiphalak Chounthirath, MS, Todd J. Brophy, BS, Huiyun Xiang, MD, MPH, PhD   PEDIATRICS,  Vol.134, Nu. 5, Nov.  2014, pg.867

The authors show the magnitude of the problem with their numbers.  63,358 children under the age of six years experience a medication dose error per year.

Fortunately very few serious reactions occurred. The medications most frequently involved were over-the-counter products for fever and pain control, and cough and cold control. For the most part these medications are greatly overused, and in infants the cough and cold products should be avoided.

In general, the least medications used the better. If nothing else, the side effects of drugs are not encountered if the product is not given. The trend to use less medications in general in the pediatric age group is a wise and healthy movement.

 

IMPACT LOCATIONS AND CONCUSSION OUTCOMES IN HIGH SCHOOL FOOTBALL PLAYER-TO-PLAYER COLLISIONS

Zachary Y. Kerr, PhD, MPH, Christy L. Collins, MA, Jason P. Mihalik, PhD, ATC, Stephen W. Marshall, PhD, Kevin M. Guskiewicz, PhD, ATC, R. Dawn Comstock, PhD  PEDIATRICS Vol. 134, Nu. 3, Sept. 2014, pg. 489

The authors point out an interesting fact; the location of the impact was independent of the concussion outcome.

This problem of concussion in tackle football is a challenging one. Can protective headgear be made more protective? Can technique of tackling make it safer? Research is underway to answer these questions.

In my practice I see as many concussions from soccer and skateboard riding as in tackle football. That does not vindicate football but says that we have many more areas of “play” that put the brain at risk to injury. This is a problem that won’t be easy to solve. It seems risky play is part of our growing up process.

I guess we can’t cover our children in bubble wrap and we don’t want to restrict them to sitting on a padded couch staring at a screen. Common sense must prevail. We must let our children be active but not allow them to pursue obviously high risk endeavors. This is a fine balance, indeed.




© 1997–2017 Intermag Productions. All rights reserved.
THE INFORMED PARENT is published by Intermag Productions, 1454 Andalusian Drive, Norco, California 92860. All columns are stories by the writer for the entertainment of the reader and neither reflect the position of THE INFORMED PARENT nor have they been checked for accuracy. WARNING: THE INFORMED PARENT or its writers assume no liability for information or advice contained in advertisements, articles, departments, lists, stories, e-mail question/answers, etc. within any issue, e-mail transmissions, comment or other transmission.
Website by Copy & Design